remote sensing of oil slicks by radar [report] by N. W. Guinard

Cover of: remote sensing of oil slicks by radar | N. W. Guinard

Published by Coast Guard Office of Research & Development in Washington .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • Oil pollution of rivers, harbors, etc.,
  • Oceanography -- Remote sensing.

Edition Notes

Book details

Other titlesChedabucto Bay case study.
Statementby N.W. Guinard [and] C.G. Purves. Prepared for: Commandant (DAT), U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters.
ContributionsPurves, C. G., joint author., United States. Coast Guard. Applied Technology Division.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsGC1085 .G8
The Physical Object
Pagination8, [10], 10 p.
Number of Pages10
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5276280M
LC Control Number71613984

Download remote sensing of oil slicks by radar

These damping effects is now well understood and such effects enables the oil slicks to be discernible from the radar image. in this paper, we are concerned with the digital technique that effectively delineates the oil slicks pattern from the SAR image.

the detected pattern allows us to estimate the coverage of oil spillage. the technique is. Oil Characterization with Radar Remote Sensing FOSTERRS, March 4 DWH rig site 16 km Photos taken over the slick on 6/23/ between and UTC (NOAA RAT-Helo and EPA/ASPECT) C.

Jones, B. Holt, S. Hensley (JPL/Caltech), B. Minchew (Caltech), Studies of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill with the UAVSAR Remote sensing of oil slicks by radar book, AGU Monograph Series, the field of radar remote sensing of oil slicks. INTRODUCTION The field of oil slick remote sensing covers science, technologies and operational services.

Science, consisting of theoretical and applied research, must sustain the physical comprehension of the problem. New remote sensing systems or operational modes. In book: Handbook of Oil Spill Science and Technology (pp) passive microwave to image oil slicks as a remote sensing tool (Yujiri et al., ; tion of oil slicks in radar images.

visible/near-infrared sensors also provide information about oil slicks not available through RADAR analysis.

Oil slicks can be visually detected through remote sensing techniques because of sharp image contrast variations between the oil slicks and surrounding water.

These contrast variations. The images showing natural (biogenic) surface slicks as well as man-made (anthropogenic) mineral oil spills were analyzed with the aim to study whether or not active radar techniques can be.

oil slicks in radar images. They are called lookalikes. Figure 1 shows a fragment of a SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) image of the North Sea with an oil slick in it. The full image consists of 8,x8, pixels, with each pixel representing a square of 30x30m.

Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging Mechanism for Oil Spills delivers the critical tool needed to understand the latest technology in radar imaging of oil spills, particularly microwave radar as a main source to understand analysis and applications in the field of marine pollution.

Filling the gap between modern physics quantum theory and applications of radar imaging of oil spills, this. Detection and tracking of oil slicks on sun-glittered visible and near infrared satellite imagery. International Journal of Remote Sensing: Vol.

30, No. 24, pp. Introduction [2] The detection and tracking of oil slicks on the sea surface has received considerable attention in recent literature due to its impact on marine ecosystems, fisheries, wildlife and other societal interests [Hu et al., ; Cheng et al., ].Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has proven to be a useful tool for oil slick mapping.

Thermal remote sensing has been used to detect oil slicks, yet estimation of slick thickness has largely remained unfeasible, mainly because the optimal detection time during a day, the minimum detectable thickness (MDT), and the relationship between the thermal response and thickness all remain largely unknown.

A viable method to implement oil spill detection and monitoring based on marine radar is proposed. The primary data of this study are obtained from the X-band marine radar. This paper presents the state of the art for oil spill detection in the world oceans.

We discuss different satellite sensors and oil spill detectability under varying conditions. In particular, we concentrate on the use of manual and automatic approaches to discriminate between oil slicks and look-alikes based on pattern recognition.

Use remote sensing radar techniques og facilities. Radar detects oil on water only in that oil will dampen water‐surface capillary waves under low to moderate wave/wind conditions. Radar offers the only potential for large‐area searches and day/night and foul weather remote sensing. Radar is costly, requires a dedicated aircraft, and is prone to many interferences.

The book discusses the instruments and principles that support a wide range of systems: optical, thermal, and radar. The text focuses on satellites-including power, data storage, and telemetry systems-because this knowledge is important for the development of new remote sensing systems.

The synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is perceived as the most significant remote sensing apparatus for the ocean and ocean waters oil slick examination, recording, documentation and propagation. Specifically, this paper examines oil spills recognition in the Persian Gulf surveyed by utilizing Sentinel-1 (SAR-C) imageries.

Overall, radar is most useful in oil spill remote sensing, particularly for mapping of large areas and for nighttime or foul weather work. Because of the all-weather and day–night capability of radar, it is now the most common means of oil spill remote sensing in offshore areas.

Fig. shows a successful application of radar to an offshore. () Alpers et al. Remote Sensing of Environment. Criteria for discriminating between radar signatures of oil films and biogenic slicks visible on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the sea surface as dark patches are critically reviewed.

We question the often claimed high success rate of. Oil spill remote sensing is an essential component of oil spill response (Fingas & Brown, ). Functions include oil spill mapping for both tactical and strategic countermeasu res, enforcement.

In summary, radar optimized for oil spills is useful in oil spill remote sensing, particularly for searches of large areas and for night-time or foul weather work. The technique is highly prone to false targets, however, and is limited to a narrow range of wind speeds (–10 m/s).

Oil Characterization with Radar Remote Sensing 16 Photos taken over the slick on 6/23/ between and UTC (NOAA RAT-Helo and EPA/ASPECT) N wind 16 km C.

Jones, B. Holt, S. Hensley (JPL/Caltech), B. Minchew (Caltech), Studies of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill with the UAVSAR Radar, AGU Monograph Series, This Special Issue is focused on various aspects of the problem of film slick remote sensing, and the articles may address, but are not limited to, the following topics: Microwave and optical, active and passive, remote sensing of oil spills on the sea surface.

This paper presents the state of the art for oil spill detection in the world oceans. We discuss different satellite sensors and oil spill detectability under varying conditions. In particular, we concentrate on the use of manual and automatic approaches to discriminate between oil slicks and look-alikes based on pattern recognition.

We conclude with a discussion of suggestions for further. Keywords: Fast Oil Spill Detection, Oil Slicks, Remote Sensing, Radar, Monitoring 1. INTRODUCTION Oil spills in the marine environment can have wide spread impact and long-term consequences on wildlife, fisheries, coastal and marine habitats, human health and livelihood, as well as recreational resources of coastal communities.

Remote Sensing of Ocean Oil-Spill Pollution The combined use of satellite-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and aircraft surveillance flights is a cost-effective way to monitor oil spills in large ocean areas and catch the polluters.

source, and surroundings of the slick. Good performance is reported for single-polarization. A novel empirical approach to categorize oil slicks’ sea surface expressions in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements into oil seeps or oil spills is investigated, contributing both to academic remote sensing research and to practical applications for the petroleum industry.

Recently, the marine habitat has been under pollution threat, which impacts many human activities as well as human life. Increasing concerns about pollution levels in the oceans and coastal regions have led to multiple approaches for measuring and mitigating marine pollution, in order to achieve sustainable marine water quality.

Satellite remote sensing, covering large and remote areas, is. Results of field experiments on radar imaging of surfactant films using satellite SAR (TerraSAR-X) co-located with Xband and Ka-band radar (scatterometer) measurements are described and analyzed.

The experiments were performed using surfactant films with pre-measured physical parameters, the surface tension and the film elasticity, at low to moderate wind and at different radar incidence angles. The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil blowout in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) led to the largest offshore oil spill in U.S.

history. The accident resulted in oil slicks that covered betw and upward of 40, km 2 of the Gulf between April and July Quantifying the actual spatial extent of oil over such synoptic scales on an operational basis and, in particular, estimating the oil volume.

Lu Y-C, Tian Q-J, Li Z () The remote sensing inversion theory of offshore oil slick thickness based on a two-beam interference model. Sci China Earth Sci Google Scholar   Lu Y-C, Tian Q-J, Li Z () The remote sensing inversion theory of offshore oil slick thickness based on a two-beam interference model.

Sci China Earth Sci Google Scholar   Another disadvantage of satellite remote sensing is the difficulty in developing algorithms to highlight the oil slicks and the long time required to do so. For the EXXON VALDEZ spill, it took over 2 months before the first group managed to “see” the oil slick in the satellite imagery, although its location was precisely known.

Optical remote sensing of oil slicks: signature analysis and systems evaluation;: Final report, Unknown Binding – January 1, by R Horvath (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Enter your mobile number or email address below and Author: R Horvath. Abstract: Marine oil spill causes ecological pollutions that result in serious impacts to the quality of marine eco-environment.

Effective oil spill detection and monitoring are the basis for the rapid response and play an important role. Due to its all-weather, day and night detection, wide coverage, and real-time monitoring capability, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is the most applicable.

detection of oil slicks within a distance of 80 km to one side of the aircraft or 40 km of both sides. The radar may also be used to generally monitor ship traffic in the surveillance area. Dear Colleagues, As Guest Editor for Remote Sensing, I am very happy to announce this Special Issue on “Remote Sensing Observations for Oil Spill Monitoring.”The Editors and I are warmly inviting you to contribute with state-of-the-art research papers on the monitoring of oil pollution of the marine, coastal, and land environments, in which remote sensing techniques have such a crucial.

• Radar is an active remote sensing system & can operate day/night 14 How Radar Works Microwave energy pulses (A) are emitted at regular intervals and focused by the antenna into a radar beam (B) directed downwards and to the side. The radar beam illuminates the surface obliquely at a right angle to the motion of the platform.

Oil slicks are visible only for a limited range of wind speeds. In view of dramatic short and long term effects caused by sea oil spills, as a matter of fact, the support of sa tellite -based remote sensing systems have been strongly encouraged.

The field of oil slick remote sensing covers the science, technologies and operational services. Radar from satellites has mapped floods, geological structures, three-dimensional topography, and surface movement associated with earthquakes and sub-sidence. It has also been used to map oil slicks on the sea over the entire Brazilian Shelf in a survey, and as part of a worldwide Offshore Basin Screening™ project.

Scattering, Natural Surfaces, and Fractals provides a comprehensive overview of electromagnetic scattering from natural surfaces, ranging from the classical to the more recent (fractal) remote sensing applications become increasingly important, this text provides readers with a solid background in interpretation, classification and thematization of microwave images.Oil slicks are sea-surface expressions of exploration and production oil, ship-and orphan-spills.

False targets are associated with environmental phenomena, such as biogenic films, algal blooms, upwelling, low wind, or rain cells.Remote sensing study of historical changes in natural oil slick volumes in the Santa Barbara Channel.

40030 views Friday, November 13, 2020